Amos Ellmaker Kapp

Amos Ellmaker Kapp

Male 1809 - 23 sep1887

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  • Name Amos Ellmaker Kapp 
    Born 27 Aug 1809  Harrisburg, PA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 23 sep1887  Northumberland, PA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Northumberland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I56  Clark-Hart
    Last Modified 26 Aug 2017 

    Father Michael Kapp,   b. 01 Aug 1770, Schaefferstown, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 01 Jul 1830, Harrisburg, Dauphin, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years) 
    Mother Mary Ellmaker 
    Family ID F36  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 27 Aug 1809 - Harrisburg, PA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 23 sep1887 - Northumberland, PA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Northumberland Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Photos
    Helen Virginia Kapp - DAR Certificate
    Helen Virginia Kapp - DAR Certificate
    Descended from Peter Withington and Leonard Elmaker

    Documents
    1887 - Obituary - Amos Ellmaker Kapp
    1887 - Obituary - Amos Ellmaker Kapp
    Walking tour of Historic Nortmberland (2003)
    Walking tour of Historic Nortmberland (2003)
    Item #9 = 206 Priestley Avenue - 1866 home of Martha Kapp (widow of Michael M Kapp)
    1966 - JKC memorial for Martin W. Clement
    1966 - JKC memorial for Martin W. Clement
    President of Pennsylvania Railroad - Trinity College life trustee and Mentor for John Kapp Clark.

    Headstones
    GHeadstone
    GHeadstone
    Riverview Cemetery - Northumberland, PA
    Find A Grave
    Find A Grave
    Riverview Cemetery Northumberland Northumberland County Pennsylvania

    Histories
    Calder and Kapp Stagecoach line
    Calder and Kapp Stagecoach line
    Served travellers between Harrisburg and Williamsport PA
    Biography of Amos Elmaker Kapp
    Biography of Amos Elmaker Kapp
    Started the Kapp and Calder stagecoach line
    Momories of Amos Ellmaker Kapp
    Momories of Amos Ellmaker Kapp
    Newspaper Interview
    History Kapp and Calder Stagecoach line
    History Kapp and Calder Stagecoach line
    Mifflinberg Telegraph
    History of St Mark's Church, Northumberland, PA
    History of St Mark's Church, Northumberland, PA
    Amos Elmaker Kapp and Michael M Kapp among founders. Alice A. Kapp baptised here.
    Biography of Amos E Kapp
    Biography of Amos E Kapp
    From Genealogical and biographical annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania
    The First Cousin to Michael M Kapp
    The First Cousin to Michael M Kapp

  • Notes 
    • Amos was a son of Michael & Mary (Ellmaker) Kapp. He came to Northumberland in December 1832 where he took over the stagecoach business in partnership with William Calder. They also ran packets on the canal which paralleled the Susquehanna River.

      Amos organized the First National Bank of Northumberland and served as its president. He was on the board of directors of the Northern Central Railroad Co. He was in the lumber business and operated a highly successful farm. He served as president of the Pennsylvania Agricultural Society.
    • September 7, 1931
      Harrisburg Telegraph from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania ยท Page 57

      STAGE COACHES, THENSTEAMCARS Travel Slow and Roads Rough; Only Hardiest Attempted Far Journeys OUTSIDE of

      some delightful reminiscences of Colonel Amos v Kapp, little has been written about Pennsylvania stage coaches, or the romance which clustered ' about them.

      The advent of the canals shortly after 1830 slowed up the coaching activities. In Colonel Henry Shoemaker's book, "More Allegheny Episodes," he quotes Miss Helen Kapp's dissertation on her father's coaching activities, which she delivered to a delighted audience at a meeting of Fort Augusta Chapter, D. A. R., at Sunbury.

      "In our early history," said Miss Kapp, "there was very little traveling for pleasure; no one had a vacation, no one ever heard of Atlantic City,. Asbury Park or Newport. The only resort in those days in this State was Bedford Springs, and to get there from Northumberland, either by stage or private conveyance, took four days. "As stage coach lines became established throughout the State, traveling began to increase.

      The stage coach line from Williamsport to Harrisburg was owned and operated by my father, Colonel Amos E. Kapp, of Northumberland, and William Calder of Harrisburg. A large amount of capital was invested in this line. The coaches, the horses and equipment were the best that money could buy. The coaches were made to carry nine persons inside and Ave outside, and were drawn by four horses. The upholstering and finishings of the coaches were of the very best materials, and similar to our motor cars of today, if not better.

      On the rear of the coach was a place, called a boot, for the reception of baggage. The baggage was pro tected by a covering of leather from the storm or rain. A place in front was called a 'front boot,' where the mails and the outfit of the drivers were kept. "Passengers from Williamsport to Harrisburg left Williamsport about 12 o'clock noon and arrived at Northumberland about 9 o'clock the same evening, being on the road nine hours.

      Northumberland being a relay or distributing point, all persons going north, south, east or west were compelled to stay over night at this place and the house lately owned by the Misses Priestley and Miss Taggart on Front and King streets, kept by the Burrs, was noted throughout the State as the Great Stage Hotel. When the stage coaches were nearing a town or village the drivers would blow a large horn, thus notifying the people of their approach.

      "In leaving Williamsport, houses and drivers were exchanged seven times before reaching Harrisburg, co that a person going from Williamsport to Harrisburg was hauled by twenty - eight horses. The hotel 6iW I One of his achievements shown in heft low photo. This is o n 1 y one of many Y fine monuments to his excellent work K as a builder and contractor. V rr an n Wards 1 and 2 Pennsylvania 5 tat e Hospital Harrisburg Emerald and Atlas Sts. HARRISBURG J TELEGRAPH MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 7, 1931 29 A Type of Locomotive That Helped Put Stage Coaches Out of Business i"' f Here is an old - timer and there are very few Philadelphia and Reading Railroad employes in this vicinity who can remember when this engine was in service. It was built at the Reading shops in 1846, and shows one of the early attempts to use anthracite coal. It was a novelty all right, and while long distance traveling was slow with this engine, it filled the requirements until something better was provided. The front part of the engine was built originally for burning wood. The boiler attached included a tank and firebox. Hard coal was used to make steam and the power passed through the large pipe overhead to the front boiler. Anthracite coal was carried under the rear boiler and in boxes in the cab or the engine. Tne picture oi tnis om - umer was contributed by Peter S. Zimmerman, 425 Maclay street, chief clerk in the office of the division freight agen of the Reading Railway. keepers "and the drivers acted as agents," and collected all fares after leaving the stage - offices at Northumberland. The fare from Northumberland to Harrisburg was $2.00, or at the rate of 4 cents a mile. "Every passenger's name was taken, the amount he paid, and his destination recordrd on 'way - bill. This 'way - bill' was given to the driver, and he had to deliver it at the next place where horses were exchanged. "It was the hotel keeper's business to see that no one got on the coach who had not paid his fare, and if any one got on the stage between stations, it was the business of the driver to collect the fare and report to the next hotel keeper, so that no one got a ride without paying their fare.

      "The stage coach left Northumberland about 7 o'clock in the morning and arrived at Harrisburg at 7 o'clock in the evening, being on the road about twelve hours. Meals were gotten at the hotels where the stage stopped. A good meal cost from 25 cents to 30 cents, and was as good as you get today at a swell hotel and pay from $1.00 to $2.00. A lunch, or what was then called 'a cold check,' cost 124 cents and consisted of bread, butter, cold ham or beef, cheese, pickles and coffee. "Later on, when the Pennsylvania Railroad was completed from Harrisburg to Pittsburgh, the stages only ran as far as Clark's Ferry, where persons from the cars would be met by the stage coach and brought to Williamsport. "Mr father had a coach buili at Concord, Mass., one of the finest Hearty Congratulations 0. J. Maigne Company Manufacturers of Printers' Rollers New York, N. Y. Philadelphia, Pa. . Washington, D. C. 356 Pearl St. 2025 Hutchinson St. 627 H St. N. W. coaches ever brought to Pennsylvania at that time, which was used only on special occasions, named after his daughter, being called The Clara Coach.'

      The last governor hauled in a coach to be inaugurated was Governor Packer. Mr. Packer came from Williamsport on his way to Harrisburg to be inaugurated, and stopped at the Burr House over night, expecting to take the stage in the morning for Harrisburg. When he was about ready my father appeared on ihe scene to pay his respects to the governor, and said to him: "Do not be in a hurry; your coach will be here soon.'

      About this time the Clara coach, with four white horses, appeared to take the governor and his family on their way. Mr. Packer considered this as great a compliment as being elected to pie - side over his State. This little incident made of these two men very - warm friends through life, though differing in politics. "Besides this Susquehanna Stage Line there were lines running to Pottsville, Danville, Mifflinburg and Lewistown. All these lines centered at Northumberland, and at one time my father was the owner of 100 horses, which number of horses it required to operate these various lines of coaches. "The line of coaches on the Sus "fcnMawr - lire jjrfwv; - : Our First Building Operation in Harrisburg Homes at Second and Edwards Streets W flBB Contractor and Builder nil iv - v quehanna was only operated during the winter months, as all travel was done on the canal in summer, in packet boats. These boats were built to carry 150 persons when full. The boat was about eighty feet long by about twelve feet wide, painted white, with twenty windows on each side. These windows were protected by Venetian blinds or shutters, and these being painted green made a very pretty cc ast. Passengers were served with meals, and provided berths at night to sleep. The berths were fastened along the sides of the boat, and were separated from one another by curtains, similar to our sleeping cars at the present day. These boats were nicely furnished in the cabins, and the first sleeping cars of the Pennsylvania Railroad were built after the cabin of the Old Susquehanna packet boats. There were three of these boats running from Harrisburg to Williamsport. Their names were 'Dauphin,' 'Northumberland,' and 'Lycoming' named after the counties through which they passed. The crews of these boats consisted of a captain, two steersmen, two bowsmen, a steward, two cooks and one chambermaid. In those days they did not have time tables, so that when the packet boat was in sight, swinging . majestically along the Blue Hill, there was a bell rang I which hung on a high pole at the landing along the foot of Water Street, Northumberland, thus giving notice to the people to be there when the boat reached the wharf. The boats were drawn by three horses, and these horses were exchanged every fourteen or fifteen miles, the same as the coach horses. "It has been said that a trip on the Hudson presents the most beau tiful scenery in the United States. but it has no comparison with a trip from Williamsport to Harrisburg in the 'old packet days.' Leaving Williamsport, you passed through one of the finest agricultural districts in the State, for about a distance of about twelve miles; then you came to the famous 'Muncy Hills' on your left, towering hundreds of feet above the river. Then passing along this beautiful mountain scenery for four miles, you again came to a farming district through which you passed until you reached the town of Northumberland, where the North and West Branch Rivers form a junction, making the Susquehanna River, presenting one of the fir st views in the State. Here you crossed the river on the old West Branch Bridge, you beheld that high promonotory called 'Blue Hill. This history clustering about this old hill with its many traditions should be familiar to all. Whiia crossing the river you saw the 'leaning house' built over the river from a projecting rock by John Mason, called 'Mason's Tower' in the early history of the valley. Here you saw the profile image of the Indian - SLikellamy, the great Iroquois Regent, staring you in the face. Then you glided down through the peaceful slack water (caused by the Shamokin dam) for a distance of four miles, when ou reached another agricultural district, through which you passed for twenty - six miles, which brought you to Liverpool. Here you beheld scenery which is not surpassed anywhere in America; here you saw the peaks of seven mountains at one time, which have elicitated the admiral ion of . generations. Passing on down, you came to the fame us "irty's Notch, known in early days as the resort of highway robbers; on your right is the mountain hundreds of feet . above the rlvr; on your left tha . beautiful Susquehanna, its peaceful waters flowing through hundreds of projecting rocks on its way to the ocean.

      "In describing a trip from Williamsport to Harrisburg, I have failed to give you that rate of miles traveled per hour. The rate of travel was four and a half to Avq miles per hour." Many Happy Returns of the Day Our Sincere Wishes for Continued Success and Prosperity 1 erial Engraving Co, Fred deGroot started in building business in 1922, his first job coming the same year on the two houses shown in above photo. New York City mum The church photo below gives an idea of the different type buildings this firm has built. From modest two - story dwellings to the highest type architectural designs. 'ly.,S itf W ft half jvlfj : 1 a (Mr Church of Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament Harrisburg Harrisburg, Penna.
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